National World War I Museum

National World War I Museum

The National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial inspires thought, dialogue, and learning to make the experiences of the World War I era meaningful and relevant for present and future generations.

loading map - please wait...

National World War I Museum 39.080988, -94.585980 Events & Updates

Address:

 100 W 26th St Kansas City, Missouri 64108

Contact:

 (816) 888-8100

Hours:

 Tue – Sun:

10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Website:

www.theworldwar.org

National World War I Museum

New Amazon Prime Video anthology series The Romanoffs is centered around people who believe themselves to be the modern-day descendants of the Romanov family, with a desperate desire for a connection to their roots which affects everyone else in their sphere.

Learn more about the series, the inspiration, and the true story of the Romanovs in this Town & Country piece: ow.ly/OT3L30miMrC
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

National WWI Museum and Memorial added 11 new photos — at National WWI Museum and Memorial.

It was 100 years ago that the painting Panthéon De La Guerre made headlines in Paris at its reveal. See photographs from our Collection of its journey to the Museum and Memorial, from exhibition programs, pieces of the original paintings, and photographs of its arrival and repair at the Museum and Memorial.
... See MoreSee Less

It was 100 years ago that the painting Panthéon De La Guerre made headlines in Paris at its reveal. See photographs from our Collection of its journey to the Museum and Memorial, from exhibition programs, pieces of the original paintings, and photographs of its arrival and repair at the Museum and Memorial.

A touch up of the 1933 poster.....

13 hours ago   ·  1

2 Replies

Avatar

I read that only 7% of the original survives today. It's tragic how shabbily it was treated after 1940.

14 hours ago
Avatar

Amazing result for what the artists had to work with once it arrived at the museum.

14 hours ago   ·  2
Avatar

I was intrigued by the painting and the story also. So, I did some research. If I get anything wrong, someone please jump in and let me know. It looks like some US businessmen purchased the painting as an investment in 1927. Not a museum, not a municipality, not someone with a facility large enough to display it and an endowment to cover the costs of same. It toured the country for a while after WW I. And for a time, it was a popular and profitable attraction. But, in 1940 the economics flipped on it. The world plunged into a new war. One that would eclipse the previous in money spent and lives lost. The previous war and the painting faded from the public consciousness as death and destruction on a previously unimaginable scale ripped the world apart. At that point, it would have been impossible to generate enough interest to raise the funds necessary to either continue touring the painting about the country or to build a hall with the capacity to showcase it. Therefore, the painting was confined to a warehouse operated by Davidson Storage of Maryland. And it stayed there for 12 years until 1952, seven years after the second world war ended. And, even then it was auctioned off for a mere $3,400. Such a cheap price tells us there was almost no demand for or interest in it. And, it brings into serious question the state of repair it was in at the time. Even the restaurateur who purchased it did not seem to have a plan as to what to do with it when he purchased it in 1952. Occasionally taking it out and unrolling it just to see what he’d bought. By the time he decided to donate it to the Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri (Now the National World War I Museum and Memorial) and arrangements were made to ship it, it was 1957, five years after his original purchase. And it was shipped from the facilities of the same firm that was housing it when he bought it, Davidson Storage of Maryland. As before, creating a hall big enough to display a painting that is four and a half stories tall and one and a third football fields long is cost prohibitive, to put it mildly. If donors had been knocking down the doors of Liberty Memorial with pockets full of cash begging to build an appropriate exhibition space and restore it , in its entirety, to mint condition, I’m certain they would have agreed to hand it over. But, those were not the conditions at the time. At the time, Liberty Memorial had basically been given a “white elephant”. And they did the best they could to preserve what was there, and present it in as meaningful a way as possible given the resources available to them at the time. If they had not done so, then instead of 7% of the painting being beautifully and meaningfully preserved and displayed for subsequent generations (I happened to be at the museum and saw it today) then we would have 0% remaining as it could have just as easily ended up in a landfill. In poor repair and with no one interested in spending the time or money to preserve any of it. So, my thanks go out to the World War I Museum and Memorial for doing their best and preserving what is still a stunning glimpse of the masterpiece that once was.

14 minutes ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

www.facebook.com/theworldwar">View on Facebook